Denmark: 1 dead, 4 sick from Listeria in salmon

Joe Whitworth of Food Quality News reports that four people have been sickened and one has died from Listeria in salmon processed in Poland and sold in Denmark.

Dansk Supermarked Group issued a recall after Fødevarestyrelsen (Danish Veterinary and Food Administration) detected Listeria monocytogenes in two packs of cold-smoked salmon.

L. monocytogenes was identified at 240 CFU/g in chilled cold smoked salmon.

Listeria positive: Made-to-order salad in Hong Kong

The Centre for Food Safety (CFS) of the Food and Environmental Hygiene Department said on November 15  that a sample of mixed vegetable ingredient of a made-to-order smoked salmon mixed vegetable salad was found to have been contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes. Follow-up is in progress.

smoked-salmon-saladA spokesman for the CFS said, “The CFS took the sample of smoked salmon mixed vegetable salad for testing from a licensed food premises in Sha Tin under a risk assessment study on microbiological quality of vegetables and vegetable salads. The result showed that the salad sample contained Listeria monocytogenes at a level of 2 400 per gram, exceeding the standard of the Microbiological Guidelines for Food which states that no more than 100 of the pathogen per gram should be detected.”
The CFS has informed the premises concerned of the irregularity and instructed it to stop selling the food item in question immediately.

The CFS has also provided health education on food safety and hygiene to the person-in-charge and staff of the premises. The premises have voluntarily suspended its business temporarily to carry out thorough cleaning and disinfection. The CFS is also tracing the sources of the ingredients of the affected food item.

“Listeria monocytogenes can be easily destroyed by cooking but can survive and multiply at refrigerator temperatures.

Listeria forces recall of NZ smoked salmon products

On 27 July 2016, Prime Foods NZ Ltd recalled 50g packs of its smoked salmon slices. The recall was extended on 29 July 2016 to also include:

Prime Smoke brand Smoked Salmon Shavings (100g)

Prime Smoke brand Smoked Salmon Mixed Pieces (500g)

prime-smoke-smoked-salmon-1-600Product identification

Product type                       Smoked Salmon (Ready-to-eat meat product)

Name of product               Prime Smoke brand Smoked Salmon Slices (50g)
Prime Smoke brand Smoked Salmon Shavings (100g)
Prime Smoke brand Smoked Salmon Mixed Pieces (500g)

Batch and date marking      Prime Smoke brand Smoked Salmon Slices (50g)
Batch code 18321507
Use by 25/08/2016

Prime Smoke brand Smoked Salmon Shavings (100g)
Batch Code 17621207
Use By 22/08/2016

Prime Smoke brand Smoked Salmon Mixed Pieces (500g)
Batch Code 17621207
Use By 22/08/2016

Package size and description         Sold in plastic vacuum packages of 50g, 100g and 500g.

Distribution                         The products are sold in retail outlets and supermarkets throughout New Zealand.

Fjord Laks brand Scottish smoked salmon recalled due to Clostridium potential

The food recall warning issued on July 02, 2016 has been updated to include additional product information. This additional information was identified during clostridium.salmon.jul.16the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s (CFIA) food safety investigation.

A & E Distribution Inc. is recalling Fjord Laks brand Scottish Smoked Salmon from the marketplace because it may permit the growth of Clostridium botulinum if sold refrigerated. Consumers should not consume the recalled product described below.

If you think you became sick from consuming a recalled product, call your doctor.

Check to see if you have recalled product in your home. Recalled product should be thrown out or returned to the store where it was purchased.

Food contaminated with Clostridium botulinum toxin may not look or smell spoiled but can still make you sick. Symptoms can include nausea, vomiting, fatigue, dizziness, blurred or double vision, dry mouth, respiratory failure and paralysis. In severe cases of illness, people may die.

This recall was triggered by the CFIA inspection activities. The CFIA is conducting a food safety investigation, which may lead to the recall of other products. If other high-risk products are recalled, the CFIA will notify the public through updated Food Recall Warnings.

The CFIA is verifying that industry is removing recalled product from the marketplace.

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of this product.

Smoked salmon recalled for Listeria

Loki Fish Company of Seattle, WA is voluntarily recalling two lots of Wild Smoked Pink Salmon Portions, due to a positive test result for Listeria monocytogenes.

loki.list.salmonThe affected Wild Smoked Pink Salmon Portions comes in a 4-7 ounce, clear plastic package. The lot 121215 5594 or 121215 5613 is found on the back of the package.

Product was distributed to retail stores in Oregon and Washington, via mail order, and sold at Seattle area farmers markets. For a list of retail outlets and farmers markets that may have carried the identified product, and for other updates, please go to www.lokifish.comdisclaimer icon.

No illnesses have been reported to date in connection with Loki Fish Company product. The product is processed by Felix Custom Smoking, a Loki Fish Company co-packing vendor.

The retail sample was collected during routine sampling activities conducted by Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) and presence of Listeria monocytogenes was confirmed. This recall is being made with the knowledge of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and WSDA.

Consumers who have purchased the identified product are urged not to consume and return it to the place of purchase for a full refund. In addition to the Loki Fish Company website, consumers may contact the company directly with questions at 206-937-1048 between Monday-Friday, 9am-4pm PST.

“As a family owned fishing business that direct markets our catch, nothing is more important to us than the safety of the products we sell,” said Loki Fish Company General Manager, Dylan Knutson. Knutson continued, “We have ordered additional tests to make sure we isolate the contamination and fully understand its cause. As soon as we have additional information, we will share it with the public as well as with the FDA and WSDA.”

Not the best idea: serving smoked salmon to hospital patients

I’m not a huge smoked salmon fan, but when there’s not much to choose on a breakfast buffet, I’ll grab some with a bagel and cream cheese.

With its history of Listeria monocytogenes risks, I wouldn’t serve smoked salmon to someone who was immunocompromised.shutterstock_187930064

Or a hospital patient.

According to EJ Insight, a 79-year-old hospital patient in Hong Kong has listeriosis following a smoked salmon sandwich.

The Centre for Health Protection (CHP) epidemiological investigations revealed that the patient had consumed high-risk foods including sandwiches with smoked salmon provided by the kitchen of the private hospital in late December, Ming Pao Daily reported.

The patient has been confined at the hospital since Sept. 12 last year for several chronic diseases. She developed fever and her body conditions deteriorated since Jan. 1.

While a sample of smoked salmon collected from the hospital kitchen tested negative for Listeria monocytogenes, the patient’s blood culture yielded the bacteria.

The Centre for Food Safety (CFS) of the Food and Environmental Hygiene Department subsequently collected five smoked salmon samples and 19 environmental samples from the factory of Elegant Fine Food Limited, the food supplier, on Shipyard Lane in Quarry Bay.

Four of the samples tested positive for Listeria monocytogene, while all environmental samples were negative.

The CFS has ordered the food supplier to immediately recall all of its smoked salmon products while all of its existing stocks were confiscated. Its production lines have been suspended for sterilization.

A CFS spokesperson said investigations are ongoing.

Why is this on a hospital menu?

Netherlands: Salmonella outbreak from salmon cost €1.7m

For 20 years now, smoked salmon on bagels has been my quick breakfast go-to while driving to the rink in the early morning.

rivm-cost-salmonella_largeUnfortunately, the bagels in Australia suck.

An outbreak of Salmonella Thomson due to smoked salmon cost €1.7m, according to RIVM, the Dutch National Institute for Public Health and the Environment.

 

Marijuana-infused salmon in Denver deli? Inspector calls foul

On April 20, Rosenberg’s Bagels and Delicatessen in Denver made a marijuana-infused salmon for a private 4/20 party. Once the Denver Department of Environmental Health saw the video, a food inspector visited the restaurant at 27th Avenue and Welton Street in Five Points.

smoke.salmon.marijuana“A regulated food establishment is not allowed to prepare marijuana foods in their kitchen,” said Danica Lee, food safety section manager for the Denver Department of Health. “We did issue a cease-and-desist order to make the facility understand that they cannot do that any longer.”

The YouTube video shows where science meets cooking, as a salmon is infused with marijuana, then put in the kitchen’s smoker.

“We certainly did check to make sure that they had cleaned the equipment properly and taken care of the issue, and that they’re aware of what they can and can’t do moving forward,” said Lee. “It is important that even when a facility is closed and not operating that they’re not doing anything in that kitchen that’s in violation of the food code.”

“We took our deep clean, which uses both bleach and heavy duty oven cleaner, and scrubbed every aspect of the oven, as well as did a high-temperature burn,” said Rosenberg’s owner Joshua Pollack.

Pollack spoke with 7NEWS shortly after a food inspector came by to make sure there was no more pot baking going on.

“The store was completely shut down because we’re closed on Mondays. None of it was sold. I was all for private consumption. Everyone was 21 years or older,” said Pollack. “Nothing here is infused. We don’t sell any infused products.”

4 dead, 23000 sickened in 2012 from Salmonella Thompson related to smoked salmon in the Netherlands

On 15 August 2012, an increase in the number of Salmonella Thompson cases was noticed by the Salmonella surveillance in the Netherlands. A case–control study was performed, followed by a food investigation. In total 1,149 cases were laboratory-confirmed between August and December 2012 of which four elderly (76–91 years) were reported to have died due to the infection. The cause of the outbreak was smoked salmon processed at a single site.

r-SMOKED-SALMON-SALMONELLA-large570The smoked salmon had been continuously contaminated in the processing lines through reusable dishes, which turned out to be porous and had become loaded with bacteria.

This is the largest outbreak of salmonellosis ever recorded in the Netherlands. The temporary closure of the processing site and recall of the smoked salmon stopped the outbreak. An estimated four to six million Dutch residents were possibly exposed to the contaminated smoked salmon and an estimated 23,000 persons would have had acute gastroenteritis with S. Thompson during this outbreak.

This outbreak showed that close collaboration between diagnostic laboratories, regional public health services, the national institute for public health and the food safety authorities is essential in outbreak investigations.

Eurosurveillance, Volume 19, Issue 39

Friesema I, de Jong A, Hofhuis A, Heck M, van den Kerkhof H, de Jonge R, Hameryck D, Nagel K, van Vilsteren G, van Beek P, Notermans D, and van Pelt W.

French court fines former owner, director of Marcel Baey for 2010-2011 Listeria cover-up

A French court condemned the former director of salmon smoker Marcel Baey on April 8 in relation to an investigation into unreported listeria occurrences and misleading marketing material at the company in 2010 and 2011, reported La Voix du Nord.

smoked-salmon2-265x268The court also imposed a fine of €50,000 on the company’s former owners. However, that money is unlikely to ever be paid considering Marcel Baey’s assets were taken over by from receivership Poland’s Suempol in July 2013.

“This case relates to events between 2010 and 2011,” Marcel Baey’s current production manager Romain Marce told Undercurrent News following the court ruling. “It does not concern Suempol but the entity Marcel Baey. It is therefore the liquidator who is concerned.”

The authorities which uncovered the malpractices at Marcel Baey from 2010 to 2011 stressed that these were in the past, and that the company and its owners Suempol are fully compliant with regulations.

According to La Voix du Nord, the court heard that Marcel Baey had dissimulated a sanitary crisis in 2010 and 2011. The Boulogne-sur-mer-based company was also found guilty of misleading promotion on its products.

The findings were uncovered by the French agency Direction departementale de la protection des populations (DPPP), which started investigating the company following hear-say from competitors.