More Hep A means more human shit where fish swim

REO Speedwagon was a terrible band.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), are assisting state and local officials in assessing the risk of hepatitis A virus exposure from contaminated frozen tuna sourced from Sustainable Seafood Company, Vietnam, and Santa Cruz Seafood Inc., Philippines. If unvaccinated consumers have consumed the recalled product within the last two weeks, post-exposure prophylaxis may help prevent hepatitis A virus infection.

Prior to FDA’s announcement, Hilo Fish Company alerted its customers and distribution partners directly to let them know about the company’s voluntary recall of certain tuna products on May 18. The FDA received records from the company or its distribution partners indicating that they sold frozen tuna to the establishments listed on the FDA’s website. The FDA is working with Hilo and other distributors to ensure that the companies remove product from the market. The table containing the names of establishments have been updated.

It is the responsibility of the Hilo Fish Company to notify its customers about the voluntary recall. It is also the responsibility of any company that received a recall notice from Hilo Fish Company to notify its customers. The establishments identified on the FDA’s website should have received a notice from Hilo Fish Company or their direct supplier. If they have not, they should reach out to their suppliers for more information. Any company that has questions about the voluntary recall or has affected product and did not receive notice should contact the FDA at 1-800-SAFEFOOD.

Raw still risky: 46 sick in multistate outbreak of Salmonella Paratyphi B variant L(+) tartrate(+) infections linked to frozen raw tuna

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that as of July 14, 2015, 60 people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Paratyphi B variant L(+) tartrate(+) have been reported from 11 states. Eleven ill people have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported. 

tuna.april.15This outbreak is caused by Salmonella Paratyphi B variant L(+) tartrate(+) bacteria, formerly known as Salmonella Java.

Epidemiologic and laboratory findings indicate that frozen raw tuna is the likely source of the infections.

Most ill people in the outbreak reported eating sushi made with raw tuna in the week before becoming sick.

The Minnesota Department of Health and Department of Agriculture isolated the outbreak strain from samples of unopened frozen raw tuna collected from a Minnesota grocery store where an ill person in this outbreak reported eating tuna sushi. The contaminated frozen raw tuna collected from the store was imported from Indonesia.

Restaurants and retailers should not sell or serve any tuna from the contaminated lot of frozen raw tuna tested by Minnesota imported from Indonesia by Osamu Corporation, or the previously recalled[PDF – 1 page] ground frozen yellowfin tuna also imported from Indonesia by Osamu Corporation.

People at higher risk for serious foodborne illness should not eat any raw fish or raw shellfish, regardless of an ongoing outbreak. These groups include:

Children younger than 5 years

Adults older than 65

Pregnant women

People with weakened immune systems.

Since the last update on June 5, 2015, seven new ill people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Paratyphi B variant L(+) tartrate(+) have been reported from Arizona (1), California (3), Michigan (1), and Minnesota (2). As of July 14, 2015, 60 people have been reported from 11 states. The number of ill people reported from each state is as follows: Arizona (11), California (34), Illinois (1), Michigan (1), Minnesota (2), Mississippi (1), New Mexico (6), South Dakota (1), Virginia (1), Washington (1), and Wisconsin (1).

Illness onset dates range from March 5, 2015 to June 30, 2015. Ill people range in age from younger than 1 year to 83 with a median age of 32, and 56% are male. Among 57 people with available information, 11 (19%) have been hospitalized, and no deaths have been reported.

Illnesses that occurred after June 13, 2015 might not yet be reported due to the time between when a person becomes ill and when the illness is reported. This takes an average of 2 to 4 weeks.

Epidemiologic and laboratory findings indicate that frozen raw tuna is the likely source of the infections. In interviews, ill people answered questions about foods eaten and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Of 46 ill people for whom information is known, 43 (93%) reported consuming sushi in the week before they became ill. This proportion is significantly higher when compared with results from a survey[PDF – 29 pages] of healthy people in which 5% reported eating “sushi, sashimi, or ceviche made with raw fish or shellfish” in the 7 days before they were interviewed. Of the 42 people with information about their sushi exposure, 41 (98%) reported eating a sushi item containing raw tuna, and 25 (86%) of 29 with information reported eating a sushi item containing raw “spicy tuna.” The traceback investigation is ongoing, but preliminary investigation identified that frozen raw tuna was used to make the raw tuna sushi reported by ill persons.

The Minnesota Department of Health and Department of Agriculture isolated the outbreak strain from samples of unopened frozen raw tuna products collected from a Minnesota grocery store where an ill person in this outbreak reported eating tuna sushi. The contaminated frozen raw tuna products collected from the store represented one lot of product imported from Indonesia by Osamu Corporation.

Salmonella cases in Minn linked to contaminated raw tuna, part of national outbreak

Still don’t like raw seafood – too many microbiological risks.

tuna1According to the Minnesota Department of Agriculture, two Minnesota residents sickened recently with salmonellosis are linked to frozen raw tuna, the Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) said today.

The ill Minnesotans are adults in their 30s from the metro area who became ill on June 21 and June 30. Neither was hospitalized. These cases, which are part of a larger national outbreak (See CDC: Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella), were linked to spicy tuna rolls purchased at a grocery store and a workplace cafeteria. The outbreak strain of Salmonella bacteria was found in sealed bags of frozen raw tuna from the lot used to make the spicy tuna rolls eaten by one of the cases.

The tuna was distributed by Osamu Corporation (Gardena, CA). Retail stores should not sell and consumers should not eat tuna from this lot.

Grocery stores and other retail outlets should check their raw tuna supply for bags or boxes labeled with Lot 68568 from Indonesia (check with your supplier or shipping receipts/invoices if individual bags are not labeled). Tuna from this lot may be contaminated and should be discarded and not sold or served.

Consumers concerned that they may have purchased sushi made with this tuna should contact the place where it was purchased. The investigation in Minnesota and nationally is ongoing.

 

Fortunately, there’s lots of tuna in Australia: Multistate outbreak of Salmonella linked to tuna

Unlike Chapman, I don’t like sushi, so that’s a risk reduction strategy.

tuna.april.15As of June 4, 2015, there’s still 50 sick people, but, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, no new ill people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Paratyphi B variant L(+) tartrate(+) have been identified.

CDC and state and local public health partners are continuing laboratory surveillance through PulseNet to identify additional ill people and to interview them about foods they ate before they became ill.

As a result of the ongoing investigation, the Maricopa County Environmental Services Department working with the Arizona State Public Health Laboratory tested unopened frozen ground tuna products. Arizona identified Salmonella Newport in one sample and Salmonella Weltevreden in another sample. The unopened frozen ground tuna products represented two different lots of product imported from Indonesia by Osamu Corporation of Gardena, California. On May 27, Osamu Corporation recalled the two lots of ground frozen yellowfin tuna imported from Indonesia due to possible Salmonella contamination.

A search of the PulseNet database did not identify any known human illnesses linked to the recall. State health departments continue to test samples of raw tuna products but the strain of Salmonella Paratyphi B variant L(+) tartrate(+) linked to the outbreak has not been identified.

FDA reports it has increased its monitoring of tuna. Additionally, FDA is conducting a traceback investigation. FDA is evaluating and analyzing records to determine whether there is a common source of raw tuna linked to the outbreak.

33 sickened: tuna linked to E. coli O157:H45 in South Korea

Background: In May 2013, an outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred in a high school in Incheon, South Korea. We investigated the outbreak in order to identify the pathogen and mode of transmission.

kimchi_tuna_bibimbap_00-Materials and Methods: A case–control study was performed using standardized questionnaires with a case definition of illness with diarrhea. Stool samples, environmental samples, and samples from preserved food items were collected to test pathogens. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was performed on the outbreak-related Escherichia coli strains.

Results: Thirty-three people (attack rate: 2.5%) met the case definition, and the pattern of the epidemic curve suggested a point-source outbreak. The common symptoms of cases were diarrhea (100.0%), abdominal pain (75.8%), chills (45.5%), and nausea (39.4%). Cases were found to be 8.26 times more likely to have eaten spicy fish soup with cod (95% confidence interval: 1.05–65.01). Consumption of egg soup with spring onions or braised eggs with razor clam flesh was significantly associated with illness. Atypical enteropathogenic E. coli O157:H45 was isolated from samples of 9 cases (27.3%) and tuna bibimbap. PFGE patterns of all tested isolates of O157 serotype were indistinguishable.

Conclusions: This outbreak was caused by atypical enteropathogenic E. coli O157:H45 and the food vehicle was suspected to be tuna bibimbap. The statistical analysis was not in concordance with the microbiologic tests, probably owing to low pathogenicity of atypical enteropathogenic E. coli O157. This is the first report of an outbreak caused by atypical enteropathogenic E. coli O157.

Foodborne Pathogens and Disease

Ji-Hyuk Park, Sung-Suk Oh, Kyung-Hwan Oh, Jaeseung Shin, Eun Jung Jang, Byung-Yool Jun, Seung-Ki Youn, and Seung-Hak Cho

http://online.liebertpub.com/doi/abs/10.1089/fpd.2014.1754

258 sushi eaters now sick with Salmonella

A total of 258 persons infected with the outbreak strains of Salmonella Bareilly (247 persons) or Salmonella Nchanga (11 persons) linked to tuna scrape have been reported to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control from 24 states and the District of Columbia.

Of those, 32 ill persons have been hospitalized, and no deaths have been reported.

Collaborative investigation efforts of state, local, and federal public health agencies indicate that a frozen raw yellowfin tuna product, known as Nakaochi Scrape, from Moon Marine USA Corporation is the likely source of this outbreak.

Consumers should not eat the recalled product, and retailers should not serve the recalled raw Nakaochi Scrape tuna product from Moon Marine USA Corporation.

State public health officials are interviewing ill persons to obtain information regarding foods they might have eaten and other exposures in the week prior to illness. On initial interviews, many of the ill persons reported consuming sushi, sashimi, or similar foods in a variety of locations in the week before becoming ill. Among 51 ill persons for whom information is available, 35 (69%) reported consuming sushi, sashimi, or similar foods in the week before illness onset. This percentage is higher than expected compared with results from a survey of healthy persons in which 5% of persons reported consuming sushi, sashimi, or ceviche made with raw fish or shellfish in the 7 days before they were interviewed. The investigation into specific types of sushi is ongoing.

The investigation has not conclusively identified a food source. Investigation is ongoing into individual food items and their sources. CDC, FDA, and state and local public health partners are continuing surveillance to identify and interview other ill persons about the foods they ate. CDC will update the public on the progress of this investigation as information becomes available.

Sushi eaters face their own pink slime

Amy likes the sushi. I can’t stand the stuff.

As part of that Salmonella-in-sushi outbreak that has now caused 116 confirmed illnesses, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control yesterday fingered the culprit: frozen raw yellowfin tuna product, known as Nakaochi Scrape, from Moon Marine USA Corporation.

Nakaochi Scrape is tuna backmeat that is scraped from the bones of tuna and may be used in sushi, sashimi, ceviche, and similar dishes. The product looks like raw ground tuna. Often it’s sold as spicy tuna sushi. The raw yellowfin tuna product may have passed through several distributors before reaching the restaurant and grocery market and may not be clearly labeled.

Did you know that’s what you may be getting when you get your fancy pants sushi? Amy didn’t.

I tried to explain to Amy and dozens of reporters over the past few days, why it’s sometimes a good idea to use technology to get whatever protein is available from whatever source: but a McRib isn’t actually a rib; it’s the scrapped and gathered pieces of pork mixed with secret spices and formed into a familiar shape of deliciousness to not scare people off; sorta like how religious deities appear. Same with a lot of chicken thingies. And many have now heard of pink slime.

But sushi is for the refined crowd, who don’t lower themselves to other proteinly indulgences. At least that’s what foodies tell me.

Kill steps to control dangerous bacteria are important. So is consumer choice and buyer beware. I’m going to visit my fish monger later today. The muddies are ripe, and the barramundi are plentiful.

Bad tuna sends seven Subway customers to the hospital in Vancouver

Seven customers at a Subway sandwich outlet in the international terminal of the Vancouver airport were taken to hospital on Friday afternoon suffering from an apparent bout of food poisoning.

Vancouver Coastal Health spokesman Justin Karasick said the suspected cause of their illness was some tuna that may not have been stored at the right temperature.

The customers are believed to have been stricken by a form of food poisoning known as scombroid, which occurs when there is a high level of histamine in raw or uncooked fish, said Mr. Karasick.

Antihistamines with tuna?

Michele Aquino writes:

Yellowfin tuna steaks were recently recalled due to potentially high levels of histamine in the fish. This was a relatively small recall, affecting products that were distributed in Louisiana and Mississippi markets. In 2010, Whole Foods Market issued a similar recall with their Whole Catch brand frozen tuna steaks.

Recall summaries identified the problem and explained the potential for an allergic histamine response in some individuals, which could vary in severity and include symptoms such as: burning and tingling in the mouth, facial swelling, itching, skin reactions, and possible GI discomfort (diarrhea). Statements explained this condition is known as histamine fish poisoning or scombroid toxicity, which refers to the family of fish that were originally implicated as the source of such illness. But, what I have read in the blogs today has no reference to why there might be elevated histamine in the fish.

Is this another challenge for tuna marketers? I’ve noticed an increase in tuna commercials, which I imagine are a response to years of having tuna fish evoke some sort of mercury risk…No thanks to comedian Larry David thinking twice before ordering his tuna salad sandwiches.

The source of the histamine is not to be presumed a flaw in nature’s fish, nor is the wild tuna community embracing a trendy high-histamine diet under the sea. Such a food safety risk is often a result of inadequate temperature control in processing or distribution. Bacteria present on the fish contain the enzyme histidine decarboxylase, which converts histidine in the fish tissue to histamine. By entering the temperature danger zone for too long, the bacteria on the fish multiply and this enzymatic conversion increases. The result: risky fish with a toxin that can’t be killed or deactivated by cooking temperatures.

Read more about marine toxins at the CDC: http://www.cdc.gov/nczved/divisions/dfbmd/diseases/marine_toxins/

Michele Aquino recently returned to the U.S. after serving in the Peace Corps in rural Nicaragua. He has a degree in Nutrition and Food Science and is now pursuing studies in Public Policy.