Holiday food safety: don’t wear the turkey on your head and other tips

After a 2011 trip filled with turkey and Black Friday shopping, my parents are coming to visit Raleigh next week for their annual U.S. Thanksgiving vacation. Sure, Canada has its own festivities in October but there’s something different about the American celebration. A Thursday event, followed with three days of recovery and constant football has vaulted Thanksgiving to the top of my holiday list. Hopefully the food, sports and chasing around two little kids doesn’t kill my mom and dad; it might be too much excitement for them to handle.

In Rob Gordonesque-fashion, Doug and I came up with our top-5 tips for holiday food safety last year. To supplement the list we have updated the holiday food safety infosheets for 2012 and added a set of videos on thawing, turkey preparation, thermometer use and leftovers. These were recorded with  fantastic cooking show host, and a not-too-shabby chef, NC State’s news services Matt Shipman. Check out the sheets and the video below.

Holiday meal food safety

Bathing birds is a food safety mess

Avoid foodborne illness during the holidays

This entry was posted in E. coli by Ben Chapman. Bookmark the permalink.

About Ben Chapman

Dr. Ben Chapman is an associate professor and food safety extension specialist at North Carolina State University. As a teenager, a Saturday afternoon viewing of the classic cable movie, Outbreak, sparked his interest in pathogens and public health. With the goal of less foodborne illness, his group designs, implements, and evaluates food safety strategies, messages, and media from farm-to-fork. Through reality-based research, Chapman investigates behaviors and creates interventions aimed at amateur and professional food handlers, managers, and organizational decision-makers; the gate keepers of safe food. Ben co-hosts a biweekly podcast called Food Safety Talk and tries to further engage folks online through Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and, maybe not surprisingly, Pinterest. Follow on Twitter @benjaminchapman.