Two-faced kitten ‘Biscuits & Gravy’ Janus cat dies 4 days after birth

It was probably the summer of 1985, and my future ex-wife and future veterinarian, gave me a call at home and said, you have to come see this.

A dairy calf with two symmetrically opposed heads, had been born nearby and brought to the vet school.

It died within two days.

A couple of years later I dabbled in a philosophy of science MSc, and when classmates were debating (stoned) the various accuracies of some historical writings concerning weird creatures I said, it’s biology, shit happens. I’ve seen a two-headed cow, the prof and others openly mocked me.

No worries about that, I was never cut out to be a philosopher of anything.

Shit still happens.

A two-faced kitten who was born in Oregon this past week has died just four days later … despite a hard-fought battle to pull through.

The rare feline phenom — which is often referred to as a Janus cat — was part of a litter of six kittens that popped out in Albany on Wednesday, and the owner, Kyla King, noticed one of them had two mugs on one giant head. She named the kitty Biscuits and Gravy.

Kyla and her family documented B&G’s development over the next few days, showing off their attempts to feed the kitten — which proved incredibly difficult, on account of it being able to feed itself out of both faces — as well as it playing and napping with its siblings.

The owners say Biscuit (its short name) was actually able to eat pretty decently, but he simply wouldn’t grow … and had trouble carrying its head, which was too big for its body.

In the end, the cat died of natural causes — with Kyla writing … “This photo was taken about an hour before Biscuits died. Kyla gave up 3 1/2 days of her life to put all of her efforts into saving him. He was born with the longest of odds and by living nearly 4 days, he beat those odds.”

How will the philosophers explain that one.

George and Ted and a computer tip

The writer Kurt Vonnegut used to say the most pleasure in life was rolling around on the carpet with a puppy.

Can’t disagree.

This is Ted, our 4-year-old Cavalier King Charles, with George, our new 8-week-old Cavalier King Charles.

They are cousins.

We all need puppies in dark times.

And for all those scrambling to take courses on-line, it ain’t that easy.

I, the tenured full professor, got fired from Kansas State University in 2013 because I wasn’t physically on campus.

No one is, now.

Irony can be ironic.

But here’s a tip: when recording or speaking on line, ensure the camera is the same height as your eyes (I put my my computer on a box) otherwise, you’re staring down at the screen, and it looks terrible.

Yes, George really is that small.

I plan to spend a lot of time on the floor.

Click on the url below and the cute puppies will come.

ted.george.may.20

 

Japan’s poop museum — online

A museum dedicated to poop first opened in Odaiba, Japan in 2019, and quickly became one of the most Instagrammable spots for Hongkongers to visit. And now, the museum is taking things online.

Browse through the museum’s collection of poop art and drawings, try your hand at an interactive game involving flying neon turds, and you can even download a few poopy wallpapers to use during your video chat sessions.

Swedish city dumps chicken poop on park to deter holiday celebrations

Officials in a Swedish city said they are dumping more than a ton of chicken poop on a popular park to deter revelers from gathering to celebrate a popular holiday.

The city of Lund, which annually draws crowds numbering in the tens of thousands to celebrate Walpurgis Night in its central park, said chicken manure is being spread across the park to prevent revelers from gathering to celebrate the Thursday night holiday amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Walpurgis Night, a spring festival that has roots in ancient pagan tradition, is celebrated annually on the last night of April.

Gustav Lundblad, chairman of the Lund council’s environmental committee, said the chicken poop serves multiple purposes.

“We get the opportunity to fertilize the lawns, and at the same time it will stink and so it may not be so nice to sit and drink beer in the park,” Lundblad told the Sydsvenskan newspaper.

He conceded the effort might have some unintentional side-effects for nearby residents.

“I am not a fertilizer expert, but as I understand it, it is clear that it might smell a bit outside the park as well,” Lundblad said. “These are chicken droppings, after all. I cannot guarantee that the rest of the city will be odorless. But the point is to keep people out of the city park.”

Don’t drink hand sanitizer or bleach: Poison center calls up 20% during pandemic, CDC says

A preschool-aged girl was taken to the hospital after she drank an unknown amount of hand sanitizer out of a 64-ounce bottle, fell and hit her head, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control said.

Her blood alcohol level was .27% — over 3 times the legal limit in most states, according to the CDC. The little girl recovered and was released 48 hours later, but her case illustrates the sharp increase in poisoning reported during the rise of the coronavirus in the United States.

Between January and March there were 45,550 poisonings reported to U.S. poison control centers , which is a 20% increase from years passed, the CDC reported. The rise in cases directly correlates with increased media coverage of the coronavirus pandemic in the U.S., according to the CDC.

Children ages 5 and younger, who were poisoned by disinfectants like hand sanitizer, made up nearly half of calls involving disinfecetants in that time period, the CDC reported. Over 80% of calls involved people ingesting disinfectants, according to the CDC.

In response, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is calling on the manufacturers to add a bitter ingredient to sanitizers so people will be less likely to drink them.

People are also calling more to report poisonings involving cleaners like bleach — more than 28,000 calls in that three-month period involved cleaners, News 4 San Antonio reported. The CDC cited a case where an adult woman soaked her produce in bleach, vinegar and hot water, and ended up in the hospital because she inhaled the toxic fumes.

The CDC says people should not wash produce with anything other than water, not even soap.

Researchers say they can’t show a direct link between chemical exposures and the coronavirus pandemic yet, but the correlation is alarming, Science Alert reported. The biggest surge in calls to poison control centers occurred at the beginning of March this year, according to Science Alert.

In Oregon, one of the most reported issues was people mixing bleach with water in a random container, like a soda can or water bottle, and leave it out in the open, KOIN 6 reported. Another household member will drink the solution, thinking it’s just water, according to KOIN 6.

After President Trump’s suggestion that ingesting cleaning products or applying a “very powerful light” to the body to kill the coronavirus, Lysol, the Centers for Disease Control, lawmakers, doctors, and Twitter users warned people not to do so. 

“I see the disinfectant where it knocks [the coronavirus] out in a minute, one minute,” Trump said during a daily White House coronavirus briefing last week. “And is there a way we can do something like that by injection inside, or almost a cleaning? Because you see it gets in the lungs, and it does a tremendous number on the lungs. So it’d be interesting to check that.” 

No, it wouldn’t. And by Friday, Lysol, the CDC, and others stepped in to emphasize that you should not drink or inject disinfectant. 

The CDC tweeted, “Household cleaners and disinfectants can cause health problems when not used properly.” While Lysol took a more firm stance in response to “recent speculation and social media activity.” 

“As a global leader in health and hygiene products, we must be clear that under no circumstances should our disinfectant products be administered into the human body (through injection, ingestion, or any other route.)” 

When pressed about the remark during a bill signing last Friday, Trump claimed, “I was asking a question sarcastically to reporters like you just to see what would happen.”

Kids bored during the coronavirus lockdown have been warned to steer clear of the toxic TikTok “nutmeg challenge”.

Just a teaspoon of the cooking spice can “cause significant stomach pain, vomiting, racing heart, confusion, drowsiness, agitation and hallucinations,” say poison experts.

One girl who filmed herself swigging 12g of nutmeg from a cup said it “didn’t taste bad”.

In an update “three hours later” on its effects she claimed: “I can’t move my head.

“It’s like superglued to the wall; I’m so confused, oh my God.”

The New South Wales Poisons Centre in Australia warned parents about kids ingesting the potentially lethal spice on TikTok and social media.

On Facebook, it described the video sharing service’s nutmeg challenge as a “dangerous game”.

And in Ireland, a warning has been issued on fly infestations ahead of the summer months. Due to the current lockdown restrictions, many buildings, such as offices, shops and some homes, may be empty, allowing pests to proliferate.

Really: Is it safe to spin-dry leafy greens in a washing machine?

Back when we started on our TV cooking video paper about 2000, we were appalled to watch a British celebrity cook drying carrots in the dryer.

Some of the nearly 1,000 small farmers in New England who grow leafy greens apparently dry the fresh veggies after a triple dip in water in a conventional home washing machine.

The spin cycle of a retrofitted washing machine wicks the water off the greens to dry and keep them fresher longer. This discovery by farmers offered a way to automate the drying process without investing in a prohibitively expensive, commercial-grade spinner. 

An important question lingers about this practice, which University of Massachusetts Amherst food scientists hope to answer: Is it safe?

“This has been a common practice among small producers of greens,” says Amanda Kinchla, a UMass Amherst extension associate professor of food science. “There are no regulations against this, but there is no data right now on the risk.”

Kinchla, a co-director of the USDA-funded Northeast Center to Advance Food Safety, and UMass Amherst food science colleagues Lynne McLandsborough and Matthew Moore have received a $71,000 grant from the Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources and the U.S. Department of Agriculture to study and address the microbial safety risks of processing leafy greens in washing machines. The Northeast Center to Advance Food Safety, led by the University of Vermont, promotes food safety education and technical support to small- and medium-size producers and processors in the northeast region.

The UMass Amherst team is building on work at the University of Vermont Extension, where the agricultural engineering program has been conducting workshops and creating posters for farmers on how to follow a hygienic design to convert washing machines into greens spinners and use them safely.

“My work is more impactful if I can address real-world stakeholder issues and leverage what already has been done,” Kinchla says.

Andrew Chamberlin, UVM Extension agricultural engineering technician, explains that bacteria and grime have the potential to accumulate if farmers don’t know how best to spin the greens and clean the machines. “We are trying to share best practices for food production,” he says.

For example, placing the greens in baskets that fit inside the machine results in fewer points of contact, reducing the risk of contamination, compared with putting the greens directly into the washing machine.

Kinchla’s team has converted four washing machines, based on Chamberlin’s directions, to study in the lab how contamination may occur, what kinds of microbes are present and how best to safely maintain, clean and sanitize the machine.

“We are examining whether the spin cycle on a washing machine has any more risk than commercially available, post-harvest leafy greens spinners,” Kinchla says.

Exotic food lover in China who once gobbled down a raw snake gall bladder has lungs riddled with worms

An exotic food lover from China who once devoured a snake gall has found his lungs festered with worms.

Doctors said that the infection could be caused by eating raw food or drinking unclean water.

Shocking footage shows a medic pointing out the serious, line-shaped infections on the man’s lungs on CT scans.

The Chinese resident, known by his surname Wang, recently went to a hospital in Suqian, Jiangsu province of eastern China after suffering difficulty in breathing for several months.

When the doctors asked about his dietary habits, Mr Wang said that he enjoyed having seafood, such as crayfish and river snails.

The food lover also confessed that he even gobbled down a raw snake gall once before.

The patient was later diagnosed with paragonimiasis, a food-borne parasitic infection caused by lung fluke.

Only time you’ll ever see a n Us video from me.