130 sick from Salmonella in Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal

Kellogg’s really sucks at this food safety thing.

These are the folks who said, in the aftermath of the Peanut Corporation of America outbreak in 2009 that killed nine and sickened hundreds, how the hell could we have known?

When Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal came under Salmonella-related scrutiny, the company didn’t even know who made the cereal.

They just put their name on it, like a Trump hotel.

How the hell would anyone have known?

People who give a shit about food safety, people barfing, people dying.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control reiterated its advice the other day, stating retailers should not sell any Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal. It could be contaminated with Salmonella and make people sick.  The Kellogg Company recalled Honey Smacks cereal on June 14, 2018.

CDC continues to recommend consumers not eat any Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal. People who recently became ill report eating Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal that they had in their homes.

If you see Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal for sale, do not buy it. The FDA has become aware that recalled Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal is still being offered for sale.

Thirty more ill people from 19 states were added to this outbreak since the last update on July 12, 2018.

Three more states reported ill people: Delaware, Minnesota, and Maine.

Highlights

130 people infected with the outbreak strain have been reported from 36 states.

34 people have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported.

Epidemiologic and laboratory evidence indicates that Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal is the likely source of this multistate outbreak.

At least 50 treated after reported Salmonella outbreak at teacher’s picnic in Pennsylvania

Health officials say at least 50 people were treated after a reported salmonella infection at a weekend picnic in central Pennsylvania.

The Centre Daily Times reports that Grace Prep High School said in a Facebook video Saturday that at least half of the 100 to 150 guests at a going-away picnic for a longtime teacher Friday had fallen ill with symptoms of nausea and vomiting.

Mount Nittany Medical Center said its doctors had seen 50 patients associated with a common activity since Saturday who had gastrointestinal-type symptoms.

School founder Bob Gresh said the bug had been confirmed to be salmonella. The source is unknown, but state health officials are testing samples of food from the picnic.

Frozen berries, you’re breakin’ my heart: Recall in Canada ‘cause of Salmonella

Hain Celestial Canada, ULC is recalling Europe’s Best brand Field Berry Mixes from the marketplace due to possible Salmonella contamination.

This recall was triggered by a recall in another country. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is conducting a food safety investigation, which may lead to the recall of other products. If other high-risk products are recalled, the CFIA will notify the public through updated Food Recall Warnings.

The CFIA is verifying that industry is removing recalled product from the marketplace.

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of these products.

100 sick from Salmonella in 33 states: Kellogg’s Honey Smacks Cereal still suck and still being sold

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has become aware that recalled Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal are still being offered for sale. All Honey Smacks cereal was recalled in June 2018.

Retailers cannot legally offer the cereal for sale and consumers should not purchase Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal.

The FDA has learned that some retailers are still selling this product. The FDA will continue to monitor this situation closely and follow up with retailers as we become aware of recalled products being offered for sale. Additionally, the public is urged to report any product being offered for sale to the FDA Consumer Complaint Coordinator in their region. More information about the recall can be found at FDA.gov.

The FDA, CDC, along with state and local officials are investigating a multi-state outbreak of Salmonella Mbandaka infections linked to Kellogg’s Honey Smacks sweetened puffed wheat cereal.

The CDC reports that 100 people in 33 states have become ill. There have been 30 hospitalizations and no deaths.

Following discussion with FDA, CDC, and state partners, the Kellogg Company voluntarily recalled Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal. The recalled products were distributed across the United States including Guam and Saipan and internationally. Consumers should not eat any Honey Smacks cereal.

As this is an ongoing investigation, the FDA will update this page as more information becomes available, such as product information, epidemiological results, and recalls.

The FDA provided a more detailed a list of foreign countries to which the Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal was distributed.. Here is the list of the foreign countries: Aruba/Curaçao/Saint Maarten (Netherlands Antilles), the Bahamas, Barbados, Tortola (British Virgin Islands), Costa Rica, Guatemala, Haiti, Mexico, Panama, and Tahiti (French Polynesia).

The FDA is advising consumers to not eat and to discard any Kellogg’s Honey Smacks cereal. This is regardless of size or “best if used by” dates. The recall notice accounts for all of the product that is on the market within the cereal’s estimated one year shelf-life. However, Honey Smacks products with earlier dates could also potentially be contaminated.  

The FDA quickly initiated an inspection at the contract facility where Kellogg’s Honey Smacks is manufactured. As part of the inspection, investigators collected environmental and product samples. Analysis of the environmental samples is now complete, and they were found to be a match to the outbreak strain. In addition, product samples collected and analyzed by state partners were positive for the outbreak strain of Salmonella Mbandaka. As of June 12, 2018, the manufacturing facility is no longer producing product. The FDA continues to work with the firm to address corrective actions.

When the Miami Herald filed a Freedom of Information Act request for the inspection of the facility, the FDA denied the request. The agency claimed two exemptions: “disclosure could reasonably be expected to interfere with enforcement proceedings” and possible disclosure of “trade secret and confidential commercial information.”

Salmonella in pesto triggers Irish recall

Brisbane has fabulous produce and seafood, befitting a costal sub-tropical town.

Sure, it’s way too hot for three months in the summer, but the weather is ideal the rest of the year.

A friend of mine – a food safety professional — was telling me yesterday about this snapper he got, straight of the trawler, and the pesto sauce he made to go with it.

I really try not to be Debbie/Dougie downer when people tell me their proud achievements, so I didn’t go into all the outbreaks on pesto from uncooked basil.

Usually it’s cyclospora, but the Food Safety Authority of Ireland has issued a public notification that Dunnes Stores and Spar are initiating a recall of their own brand pestos, due to the possible presence of Salmonella. Consumers who have bought the implicated batches should dispose of the product or return it to the place of purchase.

Salmonella in German eggs

According to information on a German Government-run site, a batch of organic eggs has been found to have been infected with Salmonella enteritidis.

The recall affects 11 German states and comes after thousands of Dutch eggs were recalled in Germany because of renewed fipronil contamination.

Some 73,000 Dutch eggs were withdrawn from sale in Germany after more fipronil contamination was found in eggs from the Netherlands – a year after the original scandal.

Fipronil has been found on two Dutch farms in the latest scare and the authorities expect that it will be confirmed on a third.

According to the German Government site, the salmonella contamination has affected the states of Baden-Wurttemburg, Bavaria, Berlin, Brandenburg, Bremen, Hamburg, Hesse, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, Lower Saxony, North Rhine-Westphalia, Saxony and Schleswig-Holstein. The infections were reportedly discovered during a routine testing procedure.

The infected organic eggs were stocked by several major German retailers, including Penny, Kaufland, Aldi Nord, Aldi Sued, Real, Lidl and Netto.

Salmonella strikes down wedding guests in Georgia

All 100 guests at a wedding in the Georgian Batumi were sickened with Salmonella as reported by the TV channel Rustavi 2.

It is reported that all the injured were taken to a local hospital.

It is noted that the cause of poisoning are the bacteria Salmonella, it is not reported exactly which dish they could be.

Director of the Center for public health of Adjara Nino Nizharadze said that the bacteria Salmonella could be a cream cake, if temperature for storage of dairy products broke.

At the same time in the food Agency of the country declare that when the experts of the Agency came to the restaurant, where the wedding, the food was gone.

As previously reported “FACTS” in the Russian Federation the staff of the Mariinsky theatre poisoned chicken liver with Salmonella.

Use a thermometer: Raw frozen chicken burgers sicken 68 in Canada

Craig Takeuchi of Straight writes several more cases of Salmonella have been reported in an outbreak across Canada linked to a recalled frozen raw chicken product.

The Pubic Health Agency of Canada, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Health Canada, and provincial and territorial health partners have been investigating and issued a public notice about the Salmonella Enteritidis outbreak on June 2.   

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency had issued a food recall warning on June 2 for a frozen raw breaded chicken product: No Name brand chicken burgers (1 kilogram) from Loblaw Companies Limited with a best before date of February 6, 2019 (with UPC code 0 60383 16636 6). The product was distributed nationally.

Several affected individuals in the outbreak had reported consuming the product.

As of June 18, there were nine additional cases of illness to increase the total number of infections to 68 individuals. Eight of those cases are in B.C., and the largest number is in Quebec, where there are 23 cases.

So far, 15 people have been hospitalized but no deaths have been reported.

Canadians are advised not to consume the product and to either dispose of it or return it to the store it was purchased from while restaurants are advised not to serve it. Those who do not have the original packaging and are uncertain if it is included in the food recall are advised to throw it out to be safe.

Sprouts still suck: Seven in hospital, 14 more sick with Salmonella from alfalfa sprouts in South Australia

Brad Crouch of The Advertiser writes seven people are in hospital and another 14 sick from eating alfalfa sprouts, triggering a SA Health warning to the public not to eat alfalfa sprout products produced by Adelaide business SA Sprouts.

SA Health Chief Medical Officer and Chief Public Health Officer, Professor Paddy Phillips, said there had been 21 confirmed cases of Salmonella havana linked to the sprouts.

“We are advising anyone who has purchased the recalled SA Sprouts alfalfa sprouts products to return them to the place of purchase for a refund, or throw them away,” Prof Phillips said.

“We also want to alert cafes and restaurants to check their suppliers and not serve any SA Sprouts alfalfa sprout products until further notice.

“In cases of salmonella a common food source is not often identified, however a joint investigation between SA Health, local government and Primary Industries and Regions SA (PIRSA) has linked these cases to SA Sprouts alfalfa sprouts.

“We are working closely with the producer and suppliers while we continue to investigate.”

On Salmonella, go with science or rapper who craves Honey Smacks?

Joshua Espinoza of Complex writes that Boosie Badazz is in disbelief over the 2018 Honey Smacks recall.

Just days after it was announced that the beloved cereal was linked to 73 salmonella outbreaks in 31 states, the Baton Rouge rapper went to social media demanding further proof of the reported contamination.

“I just got home and my kids told me some shit about Honey Smacks are no longer available. I don’t if this true, but I’m pissed. I need proof,” he said in an Instagram video. “I think somebody might be tryin’ to fuck with me […] They say it’s full of salmonella, they were sayin’ something—well I’m full of salmonella!”

Boosie’s love for Honey Smacks has been well documented over the years. There are a number of videos of the rapper doing nothing more than grubbing on the puffed wheat breakfast cereal.

“I need proof, man. Fuck that. They just can’t take them off the market,” he goes on in the video. “I need proof. Somebody DM proof. The scientists, somebody, DM me some proof.”

How badazz is it to eat a kid’s cereal?