Raw is risky: Maya Jama forced to miss bash after suffering food poisoning from raw tuna

I don’t know who TV star Maya Jama is but I do know food safety, and raw is risky.

raw tuna fish

The self-appointed epidemiologis shared on Instagram that she had been vomiting all day and felt ‘sad’ not to attend the bash at London’s Television Centre where she was due to present an award.

The 26-year-old already had her red carpet outfit picked out to hang with the stars, such as Oti Mabuse and Michaela Coel, on the night to celebrate the best and brightest in British TV.

The radio presenter wrote on Instagram on Sunday: ‘So saddddd I won’t be at the Baftas today,’ she wrote on her Instagram Story.

‘I ate that posh raw tuna s**t and have been [sick] all day. Was supposed to wear the dress of dreams also I might have to wear it to the shop next week to feel better.’ She also added a vomit emoji and three face palm emoji to hammer the point home.

Conch alert after cases of suspected poisoning in Bahamas

Khrisna Russell of Tribune 242 reports food safety officials are cautioning against the consumption of fresh conch after several suspected cases of conch poisoning.

Several reports of conch poisoning made the rounds on social media over the past few days before the Bahamas Agricultural Health and Food Safety Authority issued a statement yesterday.

The authority warned consumers to avoid fresh conch until officials are able to determine the source of the contamination.

Conch poisoning is typically caused by the bacterium, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, with contamination attributed to poor hygienic practices during its handling and preparation.

Health Minister Renward Wells said there had been about 10 reported cases of conch poisoning.

Vendors should also avoid having the conch sit in the sun for long periods of time and after the conch meat is removed, it should be gutted and rinsed thoroughly under potable running water for enough time to carefully remove all the slime and debris present. Also, vendors should wash their hands before and after preparation with liquid hand soap and warm running water for 20-30 seconds.

Gloves should also be worn when preparing conch salad or other fresh preparations where further cooking is not done.

Hair nets and disposable aprons should also be worn to prevent cross contamination. Gloves should be changed regularly if they become torn or in between tasks.

Other precautions include conch salad vendors utilising separate cutting boards for slicing vegetables and the conch. Cutting boards and utensils should be cleaned and sanitised in between preparations to avoid cross contamination or the carryover of contamination between preparations.

Consumers are urged to be vigilant to ensure that wherever they are purchasing raw conch dishes, vendors are following hygienic practices. Those who purchase raw conch to prepare at home should follow these preparation steps as well.

Brucellosis sickens dozens in Algeria after drinking goats milk

Outbreak News Today reportsAlgerian media is reporting an outbreak of brucellosis in Batna. According to the report, 31 people were infected with brucellosis in the municipality of Ares after consuming goat’s milk.

This followed the discovery of a focus of the disease that infected 119 goats from a herd of 155.

Brucellosis is a contagious disease of animals that also affects humans. The disease is also known as Bang’s Disease. In humans, it’s known as Undulant Fever.

The Brucella species are named for their primary hosts: Brucella melitensis is found mostly is goats ,sheep and camels, B. abortus is a pathogen of cattle, B. suis is found primarily in swine and B. canis is found in dogs.

The more common ways people get infected with brucellosis include: First, individuals that work with infected animals that have not been vaccinated against brucellosis. This would include farmers, slaughterhouse workers and veterinarians.

They get infected through direct contact or aerosols produced by the infected animal tissue. B. abortus and B. suis are most common.

The second way is through ingesting unpasteurized dairy products.

Brucellosis is also an occupational hazard to laboratory workers who inappropriately handle specimens or have an accident or spill. Brucella is highly infectious in the aerosolized form.

If someone gets infected with Brucella, the incubation period is about 2-3 weeks, though it could be months. Fever, night sweats, severe headache and body aches and other non-specific symptoms may occur.

Better camel milk

Citrox alone or in combination with 1% chitosan on the survival of Campylobacter jejuni in camel meat slices vacuum-packed and stored at 4 or 10 °C for 30 days. The shelf life of camel meat was 30 days longer using 1% or 2% Citrox in combination with 1% chitosan than when using Citrox alone. The reductions ranged from 4.0 to 3.5 logarithmic cycles during the storage period at both 4 and 10 °C. The quality of camel meat treated with Citrox plus chitosan was also better than that of the control meat and of meat treated with 0.85% NaCl.

Abstract: Camel meat is one of the most consumed meats in Arab countries. The use of natural antimicrobial agents to extend the shelf life of fresh camel meat, control Campylobacter jejuni contamination, and preserve meat quality is preferred. In this study, we determined the antimicrobial effects of using 1% or 2% Citrox alone or in combination with 1% chitosan on the survival of C. jejuni in vitro and on camel meat samples during storage at 4 or 10 °C for 30 days in vacuum packaging. We determined the total viable count (TVC (cfu/g)), total volatile base nitrogen (TVBN) content, and pH of the treated camel meat samples every three days during storage. The shelf lives of camel meat samples treated with 2% Citrox alone or in combination with 1% chitosan were longer than those of camel meat samples treated with 1% Citrox alone or in combination with 1% chitosan at both the 4 and 10 °C storage temperatures, with TVCs of <100 cfu/g after the first ten days and six days of storage at 4 and 10 °C, respectively. The addition of Citrox (1% and 2%) and 1% chitosan to camel meat samples and the application of vacuum storage were more effective than using Citrox (1% and 2%) alone and led to a reduction in C. jejuni in approximately 4.0 and 3.5 log cycles at 4 and 10 °C, respectively. The experimental results demonstrated that using a Citrox-chitosan combination improved the quality of camel meat and enhanced the longterm preservation of fresh meat for up to or more than 30 days at 4 °C.

Improving the quality and safety of fresh camel meat contaminated with Campylobacter jejuni using citgrox, chitosan, and vacuum packaging to extend shelf life

Hany M. Yehia 1,2, *, Abdulrahman H. Al-Masoud 1, Manal F. Elkhadragy 3, Shereen M. Korany 3,4, Hend M. S. Nada 5, Najla A. Albaridi 6, Abdulhakeem A. Alzahrani 1 and Mosffer M. AL-Dagal 1

https://www.google.com/url?rct=j&sa=t&url=https://www.mdpi.com/2076-2615/11/4/1152/pdf&ct=ga&cd=CAEYACoUMTA4ODk5MjIzOTkyNzc5MjU4OTkyGmY3MjNlYjUzNWU2MmRlNzY6Y29tOmVuOlVT&usg=AFQjCNEeYwnVN7vKKPk-g30USCQDhsC3tg

Do people know that flour can f**k you up: And surveys still suck

Consumers do not consider flour, a low-moisture food product, a high risk for microbial contamination. In the past 10 years, however, flour has been identified as a source of pathogenic bacteria, including Salmonella and Escherichia coli.

Online surveys were conducted to study consumers’ flour handling practices and knowledge about food safety risks related to flour. The survey also evaluated message impact on three food safety messages in communicating information and convincing consumers to adopt safe flour handling practices. Flour-using consumers (n ¼ 1,045) from the United States reported they used flour to make cakes, cookies, and bread. Most consumers stored flour in sealed containers. Less than 1% kept a record of product identification numbers, such as lot numbers, and less than 11% kept brand and use-by date information. Many consumers (85%) were unaware of flour recalls, or outbreaks, and few (17%) believed they would be affected by flour recalls or outbreaks. If the recall affected the flour they bought, nearly half of the consumers (47%) would buy the same product from a different brand for a few months before they returned to the recalled brand. Among consumers who use flour to bake, 66% said they ate raw cookie dough or batter. Raw dough “eaters” were more difficult to convince to avoid eating and playing with raw flour than “noneaters.” Food safety messages were less impactful on those raw dough eaters than noneaters. Compared with the food safety message with only recommendations, those messages with recommendations and an explanation as to the benefits of the practice were more effective in convincing consumers to change their practices. These findings provide insight into effective consumer education about safe flour handling practices and could assist in the accurate development of risk assessment models related to flour handling.

Consumer knowledge and behaviors regarding food risks associated with wheat flour, 2021

Journal of Food Protection, vol. 84 no. 4

YAOHUA FENG* AND JUAN C. ARCHILA-GODÍNEZ

https://doi.org/10.4315/JFP-19-562

https://watermark.silverchair.com/i0362-028x-84-4-628.pdf?token=AQECAHi208BE49Ooan9kkhW_Ercy7Dm3ZL_9Cf3qfKAc485ysgAAArEwggKtBgkqhkiG9w0BBwagggKeMIICmgIBADCCApMGCSqGSIb3DQEHATAeBglghkgBZQMEAS4wEQQM-2AoNuDnzs3UGNOwAgEQgIICZNrYsrhGmbrJOPRXGPMN_ykaV9_9bCmmlGbOBVMxsPAc6urDkisCTPCm6O-LzmsxLidMftqqsCH-SIVwEZvc1mtxFllqth_TYN54lFGld3RL1GXHNECNY07yQnGwTc31mqchbqhg57A8vnJ8gh8PDZ9hK3mWgr8T0c7tfXnMVjAlnQg0jMJ2pLHaZoZAZ37H4EZIz5mNioYwgkXB_Um3qwJGG5AaMPoKqk4wh-j2fnIboZu712ZcAsG7zSKg9BpWfayLhI_YutkEahqD3hcbJpKzg-H79F8zC_Y7rbv0nn4VR2VMVWjdDeFfnFdUvNZkt9TGrTJZoLYSkElS84mNV78gUTBBAayojri1Fzp6nrfwonn6yqDVB1eih4jujoaaxTUSei9tlp_aUsm9qMECCHu6pMMWXGB31HJSi4ablT8wnWYnFekA5dD7gmSMjNzS8QtVVHDhZi9mj3X2HggLql8ogEXl4eSjUhN5kGBznUh3chJmVVNj2MMQtAj6oJ6fJxDO2C8dZy2qysrTWs8V3EdQGpY1p65XtRGVQ52ZpMRULJ4xA_arfBCvi1GXJ5HNBpa44WUme68mt-JOuqqMSLmT4KjWV9IqsVr53ebdC2oRX9-huhBIaFUZVXC16pC85MAqpq8tJ5C-EH0qhEkwajI5-l3s-NRtdCq3KNIK5hDeLPVzwQb6EJ8gt7DUE1v-PKiJanr46EWmIcZ3nxPpcNzgqGFS0lkrBmijy5TRhpkn8-ZUV2QLacCcPcIJHWK_mWaAAl3ELlwnjC-iyxgOLBQpfx4_IppwW0akg2bKgl5bhgVBMg

Family pride: Maple-syrup-edition

Daughter two-of-four of the Canadian bunch is entering her Harrowsmith years.

Before the pandemic, her and her partner sold their Toronto-area house and resorted to rural Ontario where they have embraced the country life.

(Harrowsmith, the magazine, was heralded as a back-to-the-land and environmental issues platform.)

And now she and her family have made honey from maple trees on the property.

My daughter says it was a great experience and she got to spend lots of outdoor time with her two sons (who have fabulous hair).

I shared these pics with my honey-producing long-time farmer colleague,  and he wrote back, “This is sooo good, dp. You should be proud of this. Producing food. Right on! “

I am proud. Of all my five daughters.

33 sick: English outbreak of shigella in 2018 likely caused by contaminated coriander

An outbreak of Shigella in England in 2018 was most likely caused by coriander that was contaminated, according to researchers from the journal Epidemiology and Infection.

Food Safety Magazine reports that in April 2018, Public Health England was informed of cases of Shigella sonnei, of people who had eaten food from three different catering outlets. Initially, the outbreaks were investigated separately, but whole-genome sequencing (WGS) showed that they were caused by the same strain. 

Epidemiological data was analyzed, as well as the food chain and microbiological examination of food samples. WGS was used to determine the phylogenetic relatedness and antimicrobial resistance profile of the outbreak strain. 

Thirty-three cases were linked to the outbreak, and the majority of people involved had eaten food from seven outlets specializing in Indian or Middle Eastern cuisine. Five outlets were linked to two or more cases, all of which used fresh coriander, although a shared supplier was not able to be identified. An investigation at one of the outlets found that 86 percent of cases reported eating dishes with coriander, either as an ingredient or a garnish. Four cases were admitted to the hospital, and one had evidence of treatment failure with ciprofloxacin. 

Phylogenetic analysis proved that the outbreak was part of a wider, multidrug-resistant group of organisms, associated with travel to Pakistan. Likely contributing factors were poor hygiene practices during cultivation, distribution, or preparation of fresh produce.

Yersinia enterocolitica outbreak over in Sweden, iceberg lettuce is suspected

Outbreak News Today reports in a follow-up on the Yersinia enterocolitica outbreak in Sweden, The Swedish Public Health Agency says the outbreak of Yersinia enterocolitica is over.

During the period January and up to the beginning of February, twice as many people fell ill with Yersinia infection as during the same period in a normal year. Of a total of 53 cases of Yersinia enterocolitica, 33 were resident in the regions of Stockholm, Västra Götaland and Halland.

Isolates from 24 of these cases were typed by whole genome sequencing, and 16 outbreak cases with clustered isolates could be identified.

A contaminated batch of iceberg lettuce distributed to a restaurant chain is the suspected source of infection.

Nineteen die in Madagascar after eating turtle

Nineteen people, nine of them children, have died from food poisoning in Madagascar after eating a turtle, sources said Thursday.

 

Thirty-four people were hospitalized on Monday in Vatomandry, in the east of the island, after eating the protected species, the Health and Food Safety Control Agency said.

 

Ten of them died, it said.

 

Another nine people, all of them children, died at home after eating meat from the same turtle, region’s governor said.

 

Health authorities have warned against eating turtles, as well two dozen species of fish, which feed on algae that can be toxic during the November-March hot season.

 

Dozens of food poisonings occur each year in coastal Madagascar and deaths are common.