Papayas linked to outbreak of salmonellosis; over 60 ill

I really like fruits and berries. All kinds of fruits are my go-to snacks and over the past few years I’ve discovered how much I like tropical fruits like mango and papaya.

My favs aren’t immune from outbreaks. In 2017, an outbreak of Salmonella Anatum was linked to papaya.

And today CDC and FDA announced another outbreak of Salmonella (this time Uganda) traced to the fruit, causing at least 62 illnesses to date (with 23 hospitalizations).

According to the CDC release, there’s some notable stuff:

  • Of 33 ill people with available information, 22 reported being of Hispanic ethnicity.
  • The hospitalization rate in this outbreak is 66 percent among people with information available. The hospitalization rate in Salmonella outbreaks is usually around 20 percent.
  • Most of the sick people in this outbreak are adults over 60.

1 dead, over 200 sick: Salmonella Anatum infections linked to imported maradol papayas

This outbreak is one of four separate outbreaks currently under investigation that are linked to imported Maradol papayas from Mexico.

The Centers for Disease Control, public health and regulatory officials in several states, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are investigating a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Anatum infections.

Public health investigators are using the PulseNet system to identify illnesses that may be part of this outbreak. PulseNet is the national subtyping network of public health and food regulatory agency laboratories coordinated by CDC. DNA fingerprinting is performed on Salmonella bacteria isolated from ill people by using techniques called pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and whole genome sequencing (WGS). CDC PulseNet manages a national database of these DNA fingerprints to identify possible outbreaks. WGS gives a more detailed DNA fingerprint than PFGE.

This past spring, CDC investigated a multistate outbreak of Salmonella Anatum infections. Fourteen people infected with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Anatum were reported from three states. A list of the states and the number of cases in each can be found on the Case Count Map page. WGS showed that isolates from people infected with Salmonella Anatum were closely related genetically. This close genetic relationship meant that people in this outbreak were more likely to share a common source of infection.

Illnesses started on dates ranging from December 20, 2016, to April 8, 2017. Ill people ranged in age from less than 1 year to 85, with a median age of 38. Ninety-two percent were female. Among 11 people with available information, 10 (91%) were of Hispanic ethnicity. Among those 11 people, 5 (45%) were hospitalized. One death was reported from California.

In interviews, ill people answered questions about the foods they ate and other exposures in the week before they became ill. Seven (88%) of eight people interviewed reported eating papayas. This proportion was significantly higher than results from a survey of healthy Hispanic people in which 22% reported eating papayas in the week before they were interviewed. In addition, four of these seven people reported buying papayas from the same grocery store chain.

While the epidemiologic information indicated that papayas were the likely source of this outbreak at the time, investigators could not determine the specific source of contaminated papayas and the outbreak investigation ended after illnesses stopped.

FDA informed CDC that a sample from an imported papaya identified Salmonella Anatum on September 4, 2017. This sample came from a papaya from a grower in Mexico named Productores y Exportadores de Carica Papaya  de Tecomán y Costa Alegre in Tijuana, Mexico. WGS showed that the isolate from the papaya and the isolates from the 14 people infected with Salmonella Anatum this past spring were closely related. Bravo Produce Inc. was a supplier of Maradol papayas to the grocery store chain where four of seven ill people reported buying papayas. After receiving FDA’s recent Salmonella isolate from papayas, CDC reviewed the PulseNet database to look for matching DNA fingerprints in bacteria from people who got sick after the investigation closed in the spring of 2017. Six more ill people have been identified and CDC is investigating to determine if these more recent illnesses are also linked to Maradol papayas imported by Bravo Produce Inc.

On September 10, 2017, Bravo Produce Inc. recalled Maradol papayas packed by Frutas Selectas de Tijuana, S. de RL de CV. The grower of the recalled Maradol papayas is Productores y Exportadores de Carica Papaya de Tecoman y Costa Alegre in Tijuana, Mexico. The papayas were distributed to California from August 10 to August 29, 2017. The recalled papayas can be identified by the label on the fruit from the packing company, Frutas Selectas de Tijuana.

This investigation is ongoing. CDC and state and local public health partners are continuing laboratory surveillance through PulseNet to identify additional ill people and to interview them. FDA continues testing papayas from Mexico to see if other papayas from other farms are contaminated with Salmonella. Investigations are ongoing to determine if additional consumer warnings are needed beyond the advice not to eat papayas from specific importers or farms. Updates will be provided when more information is available.

Salmonella found in prepackaged cut papaya in Hong Kong

The Centre for Food Safety (CFS) of the Food and Environmental Hygiene Department announced today (November 2) that a sample of prepackaged cut papaya was found to contain a pathogen, Salmonella. The CFS is following up on the case.

solopapayaProduct details are as follows:

Product name: Thailand solo papaya

Use-by date: October 26, 2016

A spokesman for the CFS said, “The CFS has previously announced that a prepackaged cut papaya sample taken from a supermarket in Diamond Hill was found to contain Salmonella. In its follow-up investigation, the Centre detected a similar irregularity in another sample of the same kind but of a different batch from the same vendor.

The test result showed the presence of Salmonella in a sample size of 25 grams, exceeding the standard of the Microbiological Guidelines for Food which states that Salmonella should not be detected in 25 grams of food.”

The spokesman said that the CFS has informed the vendor concerned of the irregularity. Prosecution will be instituted should there be sufficient evidence. It was noted that the retail outlet concerned had stopped selling the affected product and the above-mentioned unsatisfactory sample was taken before the sale suspension.

The Centre has also provided health education on food safety and hygiene for the person-in-charge and staff of the vendor concerned, and has requested the vendor to carry out thorough cleaning and disinfection.

That’s a lot of salmonella; 15% of Mexican papayas salmonella-positive

U.S. and Mexican officials have been working closely together to find the source or sources of contamination of Salmonella in fresh papayas entering the U.S. from Mexico. From May 12, 2011, to August 18, 2011, FDA analysis found a 15.6 percent Salmonella contamination rate. The positive samples were from 28 different firms and include nearly all the major papaya producing regions in Mexico.

Papayas from Mexico have been linked to approximately 100 cases of Salmonella Agona in 23 U.S. states.

Under a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Import Alert issued today, papayas from each source in Mexico may be denied admission into the United States unless the importer shows they are not contaminated with Salmonella, such as by using private laboratories to test the papayas. FDA may consider five consecutive commercial shipments over a period of time, analyzed from a validated laboratory, as being adequate for removal from the Import Alert.

Simultaneously, FDA and Mexican officials are stepping up their joint effort to trace recent contamination incidents back to their source and discover their cause or causes, in order to inform future prevention strategies. FDA and Mexican officials also are collaborating on laboratory methodologies used in Mexico for testing fresh papayas for Salmonella.

Beyond these immediate steps, the Mexican government and papaya industry have agreed to a longer range action plan that will define proper food safety procedures throughout the chain of production and distribution in Mexico and verify that the procedures are working effectively through product testing and other government oversight. Mexican officials are overseeing the industry’s implementation of the action plan and the FDA is collaborating with the Mexican government in this effort.

Nuevo Folleto Informativo: 97 enfermos de Salmonella Agona; brote nacional causado por papayas

Traducido por Gonzalo Erdozain

Resumen del folleto informativo mas reciente:

– Las papayas retiradas del mercado han sido vendidas por Agromod Produce Inc. bajo distintas marcas: Blondie, Yaya, Mañanita, y Tastylicious.

– Se ha demostrado que la papaya cortada y mantenida a temperaturas de 75°F a 80°F favorece el crecimiento de Salmonella en 6 horas.

– Papayas frescas, cortadas, ya han causado dos brotes previos de Salmonella (Australia 2006-07; Singapur, 1996).

– En el brote Australiano, Salmonella fue encontrada en el agua del rio usada para lavar las papayas antes de ser vendidas.

Los folletos informativos son creados semanalmente y puestos en restaurantes, tiendas y granjas, y son usados para entrenar y educar a través del mundo. Si usted quiere proponer un tema o mandar fotos para los folletos, contacte a Ben Chapman a benjamin_chapman@ncsu.edu.

Puede seguir las historias de los folletos informativos y barfblog en twitter@benjaminchapman y @barfblog.
 

Papaya grown in Mexico sickens 97 with salmonella

Agromod Produce, Inc. of McAllen, Texas is recalling all papayas, because they have the potential to be contaminated with salmonella.

According to a company press release, the papayas were imported from Mexico and are possibly linked to 97 reported cases of Salmonella Agona, including 10 hospitalizations, in 23 states throughout the U.S.

Recent sampling by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration found the outbreak strain in two papaya samples collected at Agromod Produce, Inc. location in McAllen, TX and at the U.S. border destined for Agromod Produce, Inc.

The shipments that tested positive with the outbreak strain were not distributed in the U.S. Distribution of the product has been suspended while FDA and the company continue their investigation as to the source of the problem.

Whole Papayas were distributed nationwide and to Canada through retail stores and wholesalers.?? Agromod is recalling all Blondie, Yaya, Mañanita, and Tastylicious Brand papayas sold prior to July 23, 2011. Each Blondie Brand papaya can be identified by a blue and orange sticker label with green and white lettering on the fruit that states Blondie 4395 Mexico.

The Yaya Brand Papayas can be identified by a yellow, red, orange, and green label with white, green and red lettering that reads Yaya Premium Papayas Yaya PLU-4395 Mexico. Each Mañanita Brand Papaya can be identified by a green, yellow and red sticker label that states Mexico Mañanita 4395. The Tastylicious Brand Papayas can be identified by a white and blue sticker with red and white lettering that states 4395 Tastylicious MEXICO.??

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has issued a similar health hazard alert.